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History or Sociology of ScienceCognate Society

According to the Matthew effect, scientists who have previously been rewarded are more likely to be rewarded again. Although widely discussed, it remains contentious what explains this effect and whether it's unfair. Using data about neuroscientists, we examine three factors relevant to clarifying these issues: scientists’ fecundity in supervisio...

History or Sociology of ScienceContributed Papers

In this paper, we investigate one factor that can directly contribute to—as well as indirectly shed light on the other causes of—the gender gap in academic publications: time spent in peer review. To study our problem, we link administrative data from an economics field journal with bibliographic and demographic information on the articles and ...

History or Sociology of ScienceSymposium

Why do scientific disciplines appear, disappear, merge together, or split apart? We might point to major events: the creation of new journals and departments, significant innovations, or new technologies. However, at the heart of things is a social process involving interactions among individual scientists, deciding who to collaborate with and on w...

History or Sociology of ScienceSymposium

Scientific ProgressPoster

Ten years into the replication crisis, many scientists are experiencing a deep sense of worry and scepticism. In reaction to this problem, an optimistic wave of researchers has taken the lead, turning their scientific eyes onto science itself, with the aim of making science better. These metascientists have made progress studying causes of the cris...

History or Sociology of ScienceSymposium